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Get your food business going with these Top 10 tips from the experts

(L-R): Globe myBusiness Segment Head Niko Frez and Globe Digital Ventures Product Manager Lisa Tantuco with prominent restaurateurs Abba Napa of The Moment Group, Mary Grace Dimacali of Mary Grace, Spot.ph Editor-in-Chief Jo Manalastas and Entrepreneur.com.ph’s Managing Editor PJ Caña with host Issa Litton.
(L-R): Globe myBusiness Segment Head Niko Frez and Globe Digital Ventures Product Manager Lisa Tantuco with prominent restaurateurs Abba Napa of The Moment Group, Mary Grace Dimacali of Mary Grace, Spot.ph Editor-in-Chief Jo Manalastas and Entrepreneur.com.ph’s Managing Editor PJ Caña with host Issa Litton.

Starting a business is never easy requiring a lot of time, resources and effort. From planning down to the strategizing, opening a business like a restaurant poses a lot of trial-and-error situations.

Read also: Dine Philippines 2016 – A Food Business And Tourism Caravan

 

Focusing on every entrepreneur’s pain points, Globe myBusiness, in partnership with Entrepreneur magazine hosted the first of the Globe myBusiness Academy Series called Trep Talks. Trep Talks serves as a platform for existing or new business owners to learn from more experienced colleagues and experts important tips and business advice.

Owner of The Moment Group Abba Napa talks about how she started with selling flip flops to owning a chain of restaurants in the metro.

The recently held Trep Talks hosted by Issa Litton had some of the biggest and renowned restaurateurs who shared their insights along the topic of “Create. More customers.” The speakers were Abba Napa, one of the 3 founders of the Moment Group restaurant chains that include Din Tai Fung, 8Cuts, Ooma, Manam, Bank Bar, among others; Mary Grace Dimacali, owner and founder of the famous Cafe Mary Grace; and finally Joanna Manalastas, Spot.ph’s editor-in-chief.

Mary Grace Dimacali of Cafe Mary Grace tells entrepreneurs to be patient and take their time to grow their business. She said, “take it easy, take it slow, just like wine.”

The speakers gave their own insights in terms of opening a restaurant – from tips on consistency to location, design, and quality of service. Rounding up all the learnings from the session, here is a rundown of the most useful insights:

 

  • Understand who you’re creating a food business for. Sometimes we forget to start with this and instead go straight to prioritizing the dish or design. Keep in mind that you’re creating a restaurant for your customers, not for yourself, so you need to know them well.
  • Be authentic. Conceptualize your business from a place of authenticity or from a personal experience. This way you’ll have a good chance of setting yourself apart. Then be consistent with this image, and make sure everyone on your team is, too.
  • Hospitality is key. You need to love making people happy, and you need to be quality-driven. Be a valued part of your customers’ lives – make the most out of their celebrations and memories. They’ll remember you fondly for it, and will keep coming back.
  • Manage emotions. Know when to put your passion into something (as in creating the food, catering to your customers, and working long shifts) and when to curb your attachment (as in letting people or establishments go, breaking bad news, or making tough decisions).
  • Assess opportunities. Don’t be afraid to take plunges – when it feels like the moment is right, take the opportunity. But at the same time, if you feel the timing is wrong, don’t be afraid to take things slow. Understand that you will make mistakes, but that you will have time to fix or make up for them.
  • Roll with the punches. Once you’ve taken an opportunity, you need true grit – you (and your team) will have to accept the decision wholeheartedly and face it with courage.
  • Choose your location carefully, based on the factors that matter to you. This means considering things like traffic, space, parking availability, noise, surrounding areas, and others.
  • Expect challenges. The food industry is tough. You’ll be facing challenges every day, which is why you’ll need to be courageous, steadfast and persevering. Remember that the bad days will pass, and if you keep going you’ll see them through.
  • Be in touch with trends. A unique product will only get you so far. Eventually, you’ll either be surrounded by competition or will have to evolve to fit the market. Thus, consider – or at least be aware of the trends surrounding the food industry. That will also let you know what your market is after.
  • Be open to innovation. Every industry is constantly evolving, so get to know the technology available to you. You never know how it could help your business, and it may just be the solution to a confusing or “unsolvable” problem. In this day and age where technology keeps improving and introducing new innovations, you’re sure to make use of it in your food business.

 

Trep Talks will have more upcoming sessions and new line-up of speakers that will happen in different cities nationwide. This summer, watch out for the next Trep Talks event in Bohol and Boracay.

Read also: Globe myBusiness gives tips to working in the comfort of your own home

 

For innovations that will greatly help your business, check out the Globe RUSH Loyalty Program App at http://rush.ph/Globemybusiness and see how it can make your business activities simpler today. You may also go to https://mybusiness.globe.com.ph/ for more information on business solutions for you.

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